MMD Masterclass: Anne-Marie Malfait

New methods to study an old problem. Unraveling the neurobiology of osteoarthritis pain

Date:
21 April 2016 15:30 hrs. - 16:30 hrs.
Location:
Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289
Title:
New methods to study an old problem. Unraveling the neurobiology of osteoarthritis pain
Speaker(s):

Anne-Marie Malfait, Dept. of Biochemistry and Section of Rheumatology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Rush University, Chicago, USA

Host(s):

Esmeralda BlaneyDavidsonDept. of Experimental Rheumatology, Radboudumc

21-04-2016 15:30:0021-04-2016 16:30:00Europe/AmsterdamNew methods to study an old problem. Unraveling the neurobiology of osteoarthritis pain Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:

undefinedundefinedOsteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a chronic and painful disease of synovial joints. Joint trauma, age, and obesity are the major risk factors. Effective therapies for OA and associated joint pain are not available. The mechanisms that generate and maintain OA pain are poorly understood, in part because modeling these processes in laboratory animals is challenging. We employ the murine destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) model for the longitudinal study of OA and related pain behaviors. We use this model to unravel when and how the nociceptive pathway gets sensitized in the course of progressive knee OA. We study which molecules, generated in the OA knee, can activate joint nociceptors. Using in vivo and ex vivo neuronal (Ca)i imaging techniques, we aim to identify factors that excite subsets of sensory neurons, thus contributing to the generation of pain. We also use methods for chemogenetic silencing of subsets of neurons, in order to determine their contribution to OA pain. 

Key Publications

  • Damage-associated molecular patterns generated in osteoarthritis directly excite murinenociceptive neurons through Toll-like receptor 4. Arthritis Rheumatol. 67:2933-43, 2015. 
  • Towards a mechanism-based approach to pain management in osteoarthritis. Nat Rev Rheumatol. 9:654-64, 2013  
  • CCR2 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in experimental osteoarthritis. Proc NatlAcadSci U S A. 109:20602-7, 2012


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