Seminar: Dr. Maarten Merkx

Taking advantage of multivalency: engineering biomolecular switches for antibody sensing and actuation

Date:
18 February 2015 14:00 hrs. - 15:00 hrs.
Location:
Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289
Title:
Taking advantage of multivalency: engineering biomolecular switches for antibody sensing and actuation
Speaker(s):

Dr. Maarten Merkx, Associate Professor of Protein Engineering, Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology

Host(s):

Prof. Ger Pruijn, Dept.of  Biomolecular Chemistry, RIMLS

18-02-2015 14:00:0018-02-2015 15:00:00Europe/AmsterdamTaking advantage of multivalency: engineering biomolecular switches for antibody sensing and actuation Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:

Merkx , MaartenAbstract:

Antibody-based molecular recognition plays a dominant role in the life sciences ranging from applications in diagnostics and molecular imaging to targeted drug delivery and therapy. Antibodies are important biomarkers in broad range of diseases, and particularly important for the diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases and allergies. In addition antibody-based drug therapies constitute an important part of newly introduced drugs, most importantly in the field of oncology and inflammatory diseases. From a molecular engineering perspective, antibodies are attractive because there characteristic Y-shaped presentation of (at least) two antigen binding domains allows for the development of generic biomolecular switch mechanisms. In my lecture I'll show how these unique structural features of  antibodies can be harnessed to develop new concepts for point-of-care antibody diagnostics and the control of antibody-based targeting. Examples include the development of switchable reporter enzymes that allow simple colorimetric or luminescent detection of antibodies directly in solution and the use of bivalent peptide-DNA conjugates as easily applicable molecular locks to control antibody activity using DNA-based logic gates.

Key Publications:

  • Reversible blocking of antibodies using bivalent peptide-DNA conjugates allows protease-activatable targeting.  Chem. Science 4, 1442-1450, 2013
  • Switchable reporter enzymes based on mutually exclusive domain interactions allow antibody detection directly in solution.  ACS Chem.  Biol. 8, 2127-2132, 2013
  • Antibody activation using DNA-based logic gates. Angew. Chemie Int. Ed. in press (hot paper), 2015



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