Seminar: Jeffrey Miller

Novel strategies to activate NK cells to treat cancer

Date:
23 June 2016 09:30 hrs. - 10:30 hrs.
Location:
Tuinzaal, route 706
Title:
Novel strategies to activate NK cells to treat cancer
Speaker(s):

Jefrey S. Miller, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, USA

Host(s):

Harry Dolstra, Dept. of  Laboratory Medicine,  Radboudumc

23-06-2016 09:30:0023-06-2016 10:30:00Europe/AmsterdamNovel strategies to activate NK cells to treat cancer Tuinzaal, route 706Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:


If you would like to speak with Prof. Miller in person please contact the secretariat of the lab of Hematology, 13223, nelleke.hendriks@radboudumc.nl of Jeannette Cany, 14280, jeannette.cany@radboudumc.nl

 

undefinedundefinedThroughout his academic career Prof. Miller has been interested in NK cell biology. His laboratory is focused on understanding the mechanisms of NK cell development and determining how NK cell killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) acquisition affects NK cell function through a process referred to as NK cell education or licensing. Most recently, he has been exploring the role of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation after hematopoietic cell transplantation in enhancing NK cell reconstitution and function. CMV is the only virus known to induce the development of ”adaptive” NK cells with memory properties which are long lived and exhibit enhanced responses to subsequent exposures. Prof. Miller and his team have identified these adaptive NK cells in humans and determined that they have a methylation signature remarkably similar to that of CD8+ T cells. His long-term goal is to translate these novel findings into better NK-cell based immunotherapies to treat cancer without the morbidity of CMV infection. 

Key Publications

  • Successful adoptive transfer and in vivo expansion of human haploidentical NK cells in patients with cancer. Blood, 2005
  • Natural Killer Cell Adoptive Transfer Therapy: Exploiting the First Line of Defense Against Cancer.  Cancer J, 2015.
  • IL-15 Trispecific Killer Engagers (TriKEs) Make Natural Killer Cells Specific to CD33+ Targets While Also Inducing In Vivo Expansion, and Enhanced Function. Clin Cancer Res, 2016.


<< back to all events