Seminar: Prof. Carla Rothlin

MeTAMorphosis of Protein S

Date:
21 October 2013 00:00 hrs.
Location:
Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289
Title:
MeTAMorphosis of Protein S
Speaker(s):

Prof. Carla Rothlin, Department of Immunobiology, Yale University, School of Medicine, USA

Host(s):

Dr. Fons van de Loo, department of Rheumatology, Radboudumc

21-10-2013 00:00:00Europe/AmsterdamMeTAMorphosis of Protein S Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:

Rothlin , CarlaThe immunobiology group of Carla Rothlin at Yale university school of medicine discovered the homeostatic regulatory role of the TAM receptors as pleiotropic inhibitors of the innate immune response. In her latest publication in Immunity she describes a new role for the T-cell derived protein-S to activate TAM receptor signaling in dendritic cells thereby controlling the magnitude of the immune response.

Inflammation involves a complex interplay of biochemical pathways that trigger and shape the immune response. These culminate in a coordinated response that is essential for protection against invading pathogens. Inflammation, if unchecked, can favor the development of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, mechanisms that regulate its duration and intensity are fundamental to immune homeostasis. Her research interest is to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of inflammation and the homeostatic control of immune function. Together with Prof. Greg Lemke (Salk Institute) she has discovered a signaling pathway downstream of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, Mer) receptor tyrosine kinases that limits the amplitude and phase of the inflammatory response. Rothlin lab is currently focusing on identifying the in vivo source of TAM ligands, unraveling the molecular determinants that account for the specificity of TAM-mediated inhibition, and testing the role of TAM-mediated immune suppression in vivo. The long-term goal is to manipulate this pathway as an innovative therapeutic strategy for the inhibition or enhancement of the inflammatory response. Rothlin has an impressive track record and listed are some of her publications in high ranked international journals.

  1. Bosurgi L, Bernink JH, Delgado Cuevas V, et al. Paradoxical role of the proto-oncogene Axl and Mer receptor tyrosine kinases in colon cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Aug 6;110(32):13091-6.
  2. Carrera Silva EA, Chan PY, Joannas L, et al. T cell-derived protein S engages TAM receptor signaling in dendritic cells to control the magnitude of the immune response. Immunity. 2013 Jul 25;39(1):160-70.
  3. van den Brand BT, Abdollahi-Roodsaz S, Vermeij EA, et al. Therapeutic efficacy of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer tyrosine kinase agonists in collagen-induced arthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 2013 Mar;65(3):671-80.
  4. Lemke G, Rothlin CV. Immunobiology of the TAM receptors. Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 May;8(5):327-36. doi: 10.1038/nri2303.
  5. Rothlin CV, Lemke G. TAM receptor signaling and autoimmune disease. Curr Opin Immunol. 2010 Dec;22(6):740-6.
  6. Rothlin CV, Ghosh S, Zuniga EI, Oldstone MB, Lemke G. TAM receptors are pleiotropic inhibitors of the innate immune response. Cell. 2007 Dec 14;131(6):1124-36.


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