Seminar: Prof. Dennis Discher

Proteomics of diverse tissues reveals nuclear factors that scale with tissue stiffness and that enhance tissue differentiation

Date:
3 December 2014 14:15 hrs. - 15:00 hrs.
Location:
Hippocrates room, route 77
Title:
Proteomics of diverse tissues reveals nuclear factors that scale with tissue stiffness and that enhance tissue differentiation
Speaker(s):

Prof. Dennis Discher, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

Host(s):

Dr. Sander Leeuwenburgh, Dept. of Biomaterials, Radboudumc

03-12-2014 14:15:0003-12-2014 15:00:00Europe/AmsterdamProteomics of diverse tissues reveals nuclear factors that scale with tissue stiffness and that enhance tissue differentiation  Hippocrates room, route 77Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:

Discher , DennisThe Discher group strives to contribute to and exploit a deeper understanding of the effects of physical properties and forces in cell physiology and stem cell development, with efforts extending to pharmacology. Beyond micro/nano manipulations in various biophysical measurements, polymeric materials such as simple hydrogel matrices and amphiphilic assemblies are made and applied across topics, recognizing that most cell and tissue components are soft, with sufficient stiffness and strength to sustain the typical stress. Impacts on cell biology and biophysics have been most focused on matrix elasticity effects on stem cell differentiation with extension to the mechano-responsiveness of the nuclear envelope, as relevant to development, aging and multiple diseases. Impactful studies in delivery began by making and testing in blood circulation some novel polymer vesicles and filaments (we called polymersomes & filomicelles) which motivated us to study and exploit how cells are recognized as 'Self' versus 'Foreign' by our Immune System. Methods developed and refined range from 'Cysteine shotgun' mass spectrometry for the study of protein conformation in cells, to titration microarrays for high precision genomics, synthesis of polymers and peptides, mutagenesis, and fluorescence ultra-microscopy. Modeling efforts span statistical physics and continuum mechanics to computation-intensive Molecular Dynamics schemes.

Key Publications:

  • Nuclear Lamin-A Scales with Tissue Stiffness and Enhances Matrix-directed Differentiation. Science 341: 1240104-1 to 15, 2013.
  • Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell 126:677-689, 2006.
  • Tissue cells feel and respond to the stiffness of their substrate. Science 310:1139-1143, 2005.

 

 



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