Seminar: Prof. Matthew Bogyo

Using chemical tools to track and target proteases involved in cancer, inflammation and infection

Date:
9 July 2014 00:00 hrs.
Location:
Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289
Title:
Using chemical tools to track and target proteases involved in cancer, inflammation and infection
Speaker(s):

Prof. Matthew Bogyo, Departments of Pathology and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, USA 

Host(s):

Martijn Verdoes, Dept. of Tumor Immunology, RIMLS

09-07-2014 00:00:00Europe/AmsterdamUsing chemical tools to track and target proteases involved in cancer, inflammation and infection Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:

Matt BogyoProteases are enzymes that primarily function by degrading protein substrates. Since this process is irreversible, proteases must be carefully regulated within cells and organisms in order to prevent undesired consequences. Furthermore, proteases often play pathogenic roles in human diseases such as cancer, asthma and arthritis as well as in various types of pathogenic infections. Over the past decade, my laboratory has developed a series of small molecule probes that specifically bind to the active form of protease targets through an enzyme catalyzed chemical reaction. These reagents can be used for monitoring of global patterns of protease activity as well as to directly  identify and image protease activity in live cells and whole animals. They can also be used to monitor the efficacy and selectivity of small molecule drugs. We are currently applying these probes to study the role of specific proteases in the process of inflammation in mouse models of cancer, atherosclerosis and fibrosis. In addition, we have applied these tools to identify and therapeutically target important regulators of parasite and bacterial pathogenesis. Recent advances in these projects will be presented. 

Recent key publications:

  • Improved quenched fluorescent probe for imaging of cysteine cathepsin activity. J Am Chem Soc.;135:14726-30, 2013.
  • Small-molecule inhibition of a depalmitoylase enhances Toxoplasma host-cell invasion. Nat Chem Biol.; 9:651-6, 2013.
  • Caspase-1 activity is required to bypass macrophage apoptosis upon Salmonella infection. Nat Chem Biol.; 8:745-7, 2012.


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