Seminar: Yasuo Mori

Reactive Oxygen Species and Ion Channel Physiology

Date:
13 July 2016 11:00 hrs. - 12:00 hrs.
Location:
Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289
Title:
Reactive Oxygen Species and Ion Channel Physiology
Speaker(s):

Yasuo Mori, Kyoto University Graduate School of Engineering, Japan

Host(s):

René Bindels, Dept. of Physiology, RIMLS

13-07-2016 11:00:0013-07-2016 12:00:00Europe/AmsterdamReactive Oxygen Species and Ion Channel Physiology Figdor Lecture Theatre, 8th floor RIMLS Building, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, route 289Rimlsrimls@radboudumc.nl

Remarks / more information:

undefinedReactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and other electrophiles are known to exert stress on organisms, but are also emerging as molecules that mediate cell signaling responses.  Ca2+-permeable cation channels encoded by the transient receptor potential (trp) gene superfamily are characterized by a wide variety of activation triggers that act from outside and inside the cell. Investigating the physiological significance and activation mechanisms of TRP channel regulation by reactive species has lead to our understanding TRP channels as viable pharmacological targets, and modulators of these channels may offer therapeutic options for previously untreatable diseases.  In fact, multiple TRP channels sense reactive species and induce diverse physiological and pathological responses, such as cell death, chemokine production, and pain transduction. TRP channels sense reactive species either indirectly through second messengers or directly via oxidative modification of cysteine residues.  In this seminar, I describe the activation mechanisms and biological roles of redox-sensitive TRP channels. Especially, I will focus on TRPA1 channels and discuss its unique and high sensitivity to molecular oxygen.  Also, I will extend my discussion toward new insights in oxygen biology.

Key publications:

  • TRPM2-mediated Ca2+ influx induces chemokine production in monocytes that aggravates inflammatory neutrophil infiltration. Nature Med. 14, 738-747, 2008
  • TRPA1 underlies a sensing mechanism for O2. Nature Chem. Biol. 7, 701-711, 2011.
  • Genetically encoded fluorescent thermo-sensors for visualizing subcellular thermoregulation in living cells. Nature Method. 10,1232-1238, 2013.

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